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Weekend Reading: Tears of War – Ultimate Edition

While we at Kill Screen love to bring you our own crop of game critique and perspective, there are many articles on games, technology, and art around the web that are worth reading and sharing. So that is why this weekly reading list exists, bringing light to some of the articles that have captured our attention, and should also capture yours.

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Restoring a Lost Psychedelic Anime Classic: An Interview with the Team Reintroducing Belladonna of Sadness, Katie Skelly, The Comics Journal

Belladonna of Sadness is an erotic, Japanese animated feature from 1973, one mostly forgotten until more recently when the world wide web, as it often does, picked up on some of the visual splendors of this obscure film. Now being restored and redistributed for new audiences, writer/cartoonist Katie Skelly interviews the people responsible for reviving such a visually delicious and mysterious work of cinema.

No Bullshit: The Culture & Creativity Of Cliff Bleszinski’s Boss Key Productions, Rob Zacny, Rock Paper Shotgun

Saying that you want to revolutionize games has become as ubiquitous a notion as “part of a balanced breakfast,” but development icon Cliff Bleszinski seems to want to see that through, somehow, with his new project Lawbreakers. Rob Zacny makes an entertaining stop to Boss Key’s studio to see all the good, bad, and goofy of how Bleszinksi is running his new outfit.

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The Male Sentimental, Liz Kinnamon, mixed feelings

Gaspar Noé has been addressed and dismissed as a shock rocker of arthouse cinema, including and especially his most recent feature, Love, a 3D film overflowing with sex scenes. Liz Kinnamon goes much deeper, though, deconstructing not only the film but pop culture’s modern state of men and their emotions.

When Everything Is Bullying, Nothing Is Bullying, Jia Tolentino, Jezebel

The interpretations and subsequent cross-platform hunting parties after the release of Beyoncé’s Lemonade was one of the many turbulences on this plane called life, but it was also another illustration of the kind of emotional warpaths capable online. The shadow of bullying and abuse online has only grown, and not to lose sight of the underlying problems Jia Tolentino eloquently examines anger and persecution in this day and age.