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Jonathan Blow featured in the Atlantic and why videogames can’t catch a break.

In the past few weeks the Smithsonian Art of Videogames was poorly received, the NY Times wrote on “stupid” games and Keiji Inafune discussed why Japanese games are lacking direction. And now, Taylor Clark’s piece in The Atlantic on Jonathan Blow: Never mind that they’re now among the most lucrative forms of entertainment in America, video games are juvenile, silly, and intellectually lazy. At least that’s what Jonathan Blow thinks. But the game industry’s harshest critic is also its most cerebral developer, a maverick bent on changing the way we think about games and storytelling. With his next release, The…

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How does one subculture influence another? Moleman 2 shows the way.

Video A new documentary on the demoscene, Moleman 2 – Demoscene – The Art of the Algorithms, is out on YouTube. Moleman 2 is about the demoscene subculture, told by mostly Hungarian sceneres, but it features also some other nationalities. As an impact of the spreading of computer technology, some new art sections have been born. Some of them just digitized the analogue forms, but some produced whole new artistic forms. In former times, image-, and sound-based arts required not only intellectual but physical skills as well. Nowadays, computer programming allows us to create new-styled artworks using only our intellectual…

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How the crossover between Final Fantasy and Prada tells us more about clothing and culture.

The couture of Final Fantasy consists of characters with bountiful belt buckles who are overly zealous about zippers. This is what we’re accustomed to. The recent Final Fantasy XIII and Prada crossover however has gained a lot of buzz for how strange it is. The creative minds behind the project have some interesting things to say on the idea, Max Pearmain, Editor of Arena Homme+, said: “Our Spring issue focuses on a world of direction and escapism, and having a visually stunning video game franchise such as Final Fantasy work alongside us and a leading fashion brand like Prada to…

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PAUSE: Check out these photos of the Strong Museum’s International Center for the History of Electronic Games.

The Strong Museum’s International Center for the History of Electronic Games (ICHEG) is one of the largest repositories for the preservation of videogames and play. Check out Tom Callaway’s blog post for a rare view into the collection. Keep in mind it’s only a small glimpse into a collection of over 36,000 items. Seeing an arcade cabinet for Altered Beast is also a nice touch to today’s feature on Pendleton Ward’s love for the game. The Strong Museum and ICHEG are located in Rochester, NY – for more info click here. [Image via Tom Callaway]

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Street artist Filthy Luker takes over Manchester with a playable version of Space Invaders.

Videogames are going public! Over in Manchester street artist Filthy Luker, with some help from Red Stripe, has created an outdoor, wall-sized and playable version of Space Invaders. Luker adds a bit of personal flare to the game by using traffic cones, road signs and LED lights, “I’ve been obsessed with making art from street furniture for quite some time and had noticed the similarities between these road barriers and the classic invaders” says the art-attacker; and with LED lights transforming the installation into a fully operable game, our own obsessions can now be indulged on an unimaginable scale. Luker…

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Smithsonian videogame show recieves lukewarm reviews. Where’s the normal difficulty?

I’m confused by the different reviews of The Art of Videogames at the Smithsonian. Should we really be alright with an exhibition in easy mode? Seth Shiesel’s “An Exhibition in Easy Mode,” from the New York Times summarizes what went wrong, “The Art of Video Games” is a sanitized, uncontroversial and rigorously unprovocative introduction to the basic concepts of video games — which was, quite clearly, the point.” I understand that the exhibition was geared to new audiences and that Melissinos and Broun, organizers of the exhibition, “tried to strip from the show any strong point of view or deep…

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Digital art duo JODI comes to NY, shows off Burnout mods.

Artists Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans, better known as JODI, have an upcoming exhibition, “JODI: Street Digital,” at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens. One of the works featured shows JODI’s connection to videogame modification, Burnout (History of Car Games) (2004–2012) is a collection of video recordings of JODI playing a series of driving games produced over the past fifteen years. They screech their tires and do “donuts,” spinning in circles over and over, making the piece equal parts media history and slapstick farce. JODI, for some time now, has played an important role in crossing over videogame…

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What do we do about videogames as art?

Thatgamecompany’s Journey has already received a fair share of reviews – some encouraging and some critical. Ian Bogost’s review, A Portrait of The Artist as a game studio, from The Atlantic, is a bit more positive, and indicates that there is more to observe than just the game itself. The article explores Journey as a work of art and Thatgamecompany as a collective of sorts, While we often see the evolution of artists working in old media, ever-shifting technical terrain tends to obscure videogame makers’ aesthetic trajectories. In Thatgamecompany’s pathbreaking and gorgeous games for the Playstation 3, we get the…