Facebook-Internet-Initiative_credit_MattWilsonCreativeCommons2_embed-871x653
Article

The rocky path to widespread internet access in India

This article is part of a collaboration with iQ by Intel. If you’re reading this, you probably have internet. In fact, you may rely on the internet for a significant portion of the day. You may wake up in the morning and check the weather on your phone, or use your laptop to type out a message to your boss or coworker. You’re one of the lucky 43 percent. In India, you’re one of the 29 percent. Facebook launched Internet.org in India alongside Indian mobile company Reliance Communications in early April, hoping to discover an efficient way to provide free…

slack404page
News

Slack’s error page is actually an interactive scene from a defunct game

It wasn’t long ago that working in America was defined by a common image: people gathering around an office water cooler every morning to drink coffee and discuss the latest episode of shows like Dancing with the Stars (team Bindi, by the way). However, with 1 in 5 Americans now working from home thanks to the rise of internet, that image has become a little more dated in recent years. Instead of a water cooler, these online workers often employ chat programs like Slack, which allow them a sort of virtual office-space to gather around. With it, they’re easily able to discuss…

577f544b204375ca3cd4720167e9e078
News

Someone figure out this terrifying internet puzzle already so I can sleep at night

It’s important to appreciate the spoopiest month of the year by scouring the internet for what it does best: telling you horrifying stories that freak you the fuck out. From creepy pasta to Slender Man, you might as well think of the internet as the ultimate crowd-sourced nightmare fuel. And now we have a new addition to the group: the distressingly cryptic video puzzle sent to Johny from GadgetZZ.com this past week. Here’s what we know so far: a CD-ROM was sent from Poland to the Swedish website with a seemingly meaningless set of numbers hand written on it. After looking at the actual…

emily2
News

Relive those awkward AIM chats from your youth with this videogame

I often wonder if the internet of today will ever be as ancient a place as the internet of my youth, some 10 or 20 years into the future—if I’ll look back on my Twitter feed, the various chat programs I use with my friends, and get the same pang of nostalgia I do now from hearing Windows XP boot up and the creaking door of a friend signing-on to AIM. Given the nature of the internet today, I doubt it. Things are so permanent now. Data is sorted so neatly, documented so conveniently. I can copy and paste a…

Screen_Shot_2015-08-25_at_11.37.12_PM
News

Welcome back to the old Internet. It had problems too

It is easy to pine for the old web. The past is in the past, temporally shielded from our attempts to fetishize it and incapable of reaching through the screen to knock some sense into its eulogists. This is how the nostalgia-industrial complex, the one sector that will never take enough of a pause for us to eulogize it, flourishes.  “Cameron’s World,” a project by Cameron Askin and Anthony Hughes, attempts to revive the joys of building a personalized webpage on Geocities in the mid-to-late 90s. The resulting pages are full of overlapping graphics, bright text, animation, and even music.…

cibele4.0
News

New Cibele trailer is a taste of teen life at the beginning of the digital age

Being a teen during the rise of the internet was weird in too many ways to describe. While you were experiencing all manner of hormonal and bodily changes, the rest of the world was experiencing its own kind of tumultuous transformation. As you matured into young adulthood, attempting to navigate the social structure that came along with it, the rest of society evolved and tried to navigate this new network of online people. While you discovered your sexuality for the first time, the word “cyber sex” sent ripples across many different cultures, introducing the world to a type of intimacy…

CHFTULMWQAEL1WN
News

Beglitched features the cutest bunch of hackers you’ve ever seen

The NYU Game Center’s Incubator game, Beglitched, essentially turns the seedy and terrifying underworld of hacking into the single most kawaii tile adventure you’ll ever embark upon. For example: you know those annoying emails you get in your inbox about making your penis 6 inches longer? Well, Beglitched transforms those pests into anthropomorphized enemy “spam” types—not the boring, unwanted email kind of spam, but the canned ham kind, only with arms and legs and an adorable face. Beglitched essentially looks like an LSD fever dream overloaded with cuteness and techie double entendres. Creators Jenny Jiao Hsia and Alec Thompson describe it as a…