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A kingdom management game in the style of Tinder

You’ll know how addictive swiping can be if you’ve ever downloaded Tinder. Yes, the dating app does encourage you to be shallow (like, really shallow), but the simple choice of swipe-left or swipe-right really speeds you through prospective dates. It’s the appeal of quick decisions and minimal complexity, save the occasional tap to see more photos or—if the semi-anonymous subject is really lucky—the coveted (read: creepy) SuperLike. To some extent, Tinder has the same appeal as endless runners—swipe-up, swipe-down—in its repetition, though it trades leaping between buildings for leaping between college guys who think salmon shorts make them look slick. Though the…

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Tinder matchmaking is more like Warcraft than you might think

“Don’t hate the player, hate the game,” says the pick-up artist. “I’ve just got more game than you,” says your roommate who wears too much cologne. Comparisons between dating and gaming are commonplace in our web-obsessed culture, and thanks to a recent profile on Tinder from Fast Company, it turns out this connection is less superficial than you might think. We’ve all been there. You spend hours in matchmaking waiting to get picked for a quick game of Halo, but see no results. You’re swiping right all day on Tinder, but nobody swipes back. In this context, browsing for dates…

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This GLaDOS-inspired robot brings science to dating apps

As a young twenty-something, a small amount of my young adult life has been spent hovered around the phones of my friends, laughing as we collectively swipe right and left on Tinder. Being in a long-term committed relationship myself, I’ve never personally experienced the whims of Tinder, but its attached lingo and stigma have breezed past me in the conversations of acquaintances and their recurring stories of failed Tinder dates. Thus comes NYU Interactive Telecommunications Program graduate student Nicole He’s “True Love Tinder Robot.” Put your Tinder-armed phone in front of the robotic hand and place your hands onto the…

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India’s new political app is Tinder with a point system

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has shown himself to be a digital revolutionary for his country. He has 14 million followers on Twitter, 29 million likes on his Facebook page, and trails only behind President Obama for the highest number of online fans for a national leader. Earlier this month, he revitalized his campaign to provide fast internet connections to 250,000 Indian villages by 2019, after arranging for free wi-fi at the Taj Mahal. In India, one of the fastest growing technological platforms in the world, Modi has established himself as a social media icon. The only thing he was…